Using an inventor’s notebook to protect your invention

The United States Patent Law provides that patent rights must belong to the inventor who is the first to invent the invention. Patent rights include the right to exclude others from, among other things, making, using or selling the invention. Before other companies or individuals can manufacture, use or sell a patented product, they must request permission or license from the patent holder or the patent holder can assert his rights in a court of law. To point you in the right direction, you should read this article first at http://t2conline.com/could-you-invent-the-next-big-global-product-with-inventhelp/.

When determining who is the first to invent, consider the “date of conception”, the “reasonable diligence” and the “date of reduction to practice”. All of these terms are terms of the art used by patent attorneys, but are generally explained here. The “conception date” refers to the date when the idea was first thought of or when the inventor’s bulb first caused the issue. The “reduction date to practice” means the date on which the inventor first formed a concrete and at least minimally useful form of the idea.

It can also mean the date on which an inventor submits an application that allows a person with ordinary knowledge to make and use the invention based on the reading of the application (also called “enabling disclosure”). After the date of conception, the inventor must exercise reasonable diligence to reduce the invention to practice, which means that the inventor must be diligent in the creation of a prototype or an enabling disclosure. In general, between two inventors, the first to invent is the inventor who has the previous conception date and who can show a reasonable diligence between the date of conception and the date of reduction to practice.

Therefore, a patent can be invalid if it lists the wrong inventors. You can read this article online at https://www.christiantoday.com/article/how-inventhelp-can-assist-with-your-eco-friendly-invention/130021.htm to avoid any issues.  Generally, an inventor is defined as someone who conceived the invention. Commonly, however, many people confuse technicians who build prototypes as inventors; Many people think that inventors are similar to the owners of the company or executives of the company to whom the inventors inform. With the inventor’s notebooks, the representative of a company can determine if an employee should be classified as an inventor based on the work that the employee remembers in his notebook. Following is a general guide for companies on the use of inventors’ notebooks as a tool to protect their intellectual property rights.